Having a car stolen is a hassle, especially with belongings inside.

Stolen vehicles remind drivers to take precautions

Having a car stolen is a nightmare. Not only is a vehicle likely one of the largest purchases someone has made in their lifetime, but their are also often personal belongings inside a vehicle when it’s stolen that might not be able to be replaced.

That was definitely the case for GEELONG musician Taylor Henderson, who recently took to social media after his car was stolen.

“Is this a joke?” Henderson said. “I have tried to be the best of who I am … and now I walk outside and my car has been stolen. What kind of sick person does this? Everything in that car, from my guitar, my brand new MacBook Pro, Sony camera and a suitcase filled with clothes is now gone. Whoever you are, you are absolute filth. Taking something that’s not yours … you’d want to hope you can play my guitar like a boss.”

It didn’t take long for fans of Henderson’s to comment of the post, expressing their disgust with the crime. “Hopefully police will catch the scum bags that took your car,” Jean Muggleton wrote. While Vicki Cessar noted that it’s a learning experience adding that “I wouldn’t leave my phone in my car let alone all that.”

Utah State student learns similar lesson
In a separate incident, Tammi Seamans, who is enrolled at Utah State University, had a similar experience to Henderson’s, according to a recent report from KSL.com. Seamans’ car was stolen, and like Henderson, had a number of personal belongings taken as well.

Here 1993 Honda Civic hatchback contained clothes, a brand new laptop and a backpack with her identification and debit cards.

“All of my books, all of my notes from class, from the whole semester of lecture. I have cumulative finals, so I need this information and it’s all gone,” she told the news source.

As stealing a car can happen in no time, Seamans couldn’t have seen it coming.

“With basic tools, they can break into the car rather quickly, and once they get inside the car, it’s usually less than 60 seconds,” said Charlie Roberts, spokesman for the Division of Motor Vehicle Enforcement Division. “They get in the ignition and drive away.”

As Seamans’ laptop was in plain view, that might have been enough to encourage a break in. Motorists are encouraged to equip their vehicle with a lock box in order to keep items safe and out of the line of sight of any criminals.

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